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Press Releases

A Matabele ant carries an injured mate back to the nest after a raid. (Photo: Erik Frank)

Ants operate a unique rescue system: When an insect is injured during a fight, it calls for help. Its mates will then carry it back to the nest for recovery.

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Colonies of colon cancer cells cultured in absence of glutamine for 48 hours. The cells die in presence of high exogenous levels of MYC (middle, MYC-ER) compared to the control (EV, left).

Many tumors are thought to depend on glutamine, suggesting glutamine deprivation as therapeutic approach, but a new study shows that this effect might have been overestimated.

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Dr. Ulf Bade

A former student of the University of Würzburg, Ulf Bade today manages a foundation that is immensely important for many students: the 'Stiftung für Hochschulzulassung' which allocates university places. He believes in the importance of perseverance.

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Primary HUVECS expressing GFP targeted to the mitochondria. One of the HUVEC is infected with Chlamydia, stained against HSP60 (magenta).

To survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers of the University of Würzburg have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.

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Quantum bits are the basis for super fast quantum computers. Lately a german team of physicists took a decisive step forward in their development.

Physicists from Würzburg, Jülich and Duisburg-Essen took a decisive step forward in the development of stable quantum bits by using Majorana-particles, which are the basis for quantum computers.

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Shama Busha Pongo from the Congo studies European Law at the University of Würzburg. (Photo: Lena Köster)

Some 2,600 foreign students are enrolled at the University of Würzburg. Law student Shama Busha Pongo from the Congo came to Germany four years ago and he knows exactly what he wants.

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Microscope image of a dividing embryo of the nematode C. elegans.

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have published new insights into waste disposal in animal cells. These findings may help to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases like lupus.

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A future in Germany

03/14/2017
Pilar from Columbia has just completed her first semester of the EAGLE programme at the University of Würzburg. (Photo: Lena Köster)

Pilar Endara from Columbia is studying for a degree in the English master's programme "Applied Earth Observation and Geoanalysis for the Living Environment". In this article, she tells us about her future plans.

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Crazy about biology

03/07/2017
Taylor Stofflet, a master's student of biology, in a biophysics lab. (Photo: Lena Köster)

Studying for a master's degree in biology at the University of Würzburg (Germany) in English? No problem: Taylor Stofflet from the USA loves the program.

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Ulrich Brückner

Ulrich Brückner - the Würzburg student turned Stanford professor. He feels privileged and enjoys working with the students at Stanford University in California.

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Activation of the brain's fear network, visualized using functional magnetic resonance imaging (picture: Dr. Tina Lonsdorf, Systems Neuroscience UKE Hamburg)

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients.

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Metaphorical representation of the regulatory mechanism of the ubiquitin ligase HUWE1. The dimer form of HUWE1, as mediated by the molecular “thumb” and “pointer” regions, is inactive.

Scientists at the University of Würzburg have generated new insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling. Their results may provide new avenues for cancer therapy.

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red deer

Climate change is affecting vegetation also in our latitudes. For the first time, scientists have conducted experiments to determine to what extent wild animals are capable of adjusting to this change.

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The Christian theologian Thomas Aquinas triumphant over the teachings of the Arab Averroes (bottom centre). Panel paining in the Dominican monastery San Marco (Florence) from the mid-15th century. (Photo: Polo Museale Regionale della Toscana)

During the Renaissance, the Europeans began to supplant the Arabic roots of their culture: This is the gist of Dag Nikolaus Hasse's new book (Harvard University Press). Hasse is a professor of philosophy.

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