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Nurse bees are - contrary to forager bees - active 24/7. Their circadian clock simply continues at the protein level. (Photo: Gunnar Bartsch)

Circadian clocks control the day-night cycle of many living beings. But what do the pacemakers do in animals whose activities do not follow this pattern? Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now looked into this question.

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Snapshots of the bond of a giant vesicle on a plane model membrane. Dark pixels mark the points of contact between the membranes. They grow larger and more numerous over time. (Picture: Susanne Fenz)

Studies conducted by the Biocentre shed new light on cell-cell contacts: Physical effects play an important role in their generation and stability.

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PTTH neurons (green) connect the circadian clock (magenta) of the brain with the peripheral clock in the prothoracic gland. (Foto: AG Wegener)

Multiple biological clocks control the daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in animals and humans. Whether and how these clocks are connected with each other is still a largely open question. A new study now shows that a central clock governs the circadian rhythms in certain cases.

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An electron microscope image of a so-called micropillar with an integrated quantum dot that is capable of emitting single photons. The pillars, which are a hundred times thinner than a hair, are made at the University of Würzburg.

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

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Johannes Obergfell

Johannes Obergfell came across the topic of migration thanks to his magister thesis. Today, he works at the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees. A "smoky office" is one of his prominent memories of his time at university.

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[Translate to Englisch:] Fotos von einer Venusfliegenfalle, ihre Drüsen unter dem Mikroskop und schematische Darstellung der Vorgänge, die zur Sekretion führen. (Bild: Sönke Scherzer/Dirk Becker)

The Venus flytrap digests its prey using enzymes produced by special glands. For the first time, a research team has measured and meticulously analysed the glands' activity.

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Professor Laurens Molenkamp with some of the numerous award certificates he has received over the past years. (Photo: Jasper Molenkamp)

Top research pays off: After 2011, Professor of Physics Laurens Molenkamp from the University of Würzburg has been awarded a second Advanced Grant from the European Research Council worth 2.5 million euros.

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A Matabele ant carries an injured mate back to the nest after a raid. (Photo: Erik Frank)

Ants operate a unique rescue system: When an insect is injured during a fight, it calls for help. Its mates will then carry it back to the nest for recovery.

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Colonies of colon cancer cells cultured in absence of glutamine for 48 hours. The cells die in presence of high exogenous levels of MYC (middle, MYC-ER) compared to the control (EV, left).

Many tumors are thought to depend on glutamine, suggesting glutamine deprivation as therapeutic approach, but a new study shows that this effect might have been overestimated.

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Dr. Ulf Bade

A former student of the University of Würzburg, Ulf Bade today manages a foundation that is immensely important for many students: the 'Stiftung für Hochschulzulassung' which allocates university places. He believes in the importance of perseverance.

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Primary HUVECS expressing GFP targeted to the mitochondria. One of the HUVEC is infected with Chlamydia, stained against HSP60 (magenta).

To survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers of the University of Würzburg have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.

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Quantum bits are the basis for super fast quantum computers. Lately a german team of physicists took a decisive step forward in their development.

Physicists from Würzburg, Jülich and Duisburg-Essen took a decisive step forward in the development of stable quantum bits by using Majorana-particles, which are the basis for quantum computers.

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Shama Busha Pongo from the Congo studies European Law at the University of Würzburg. (Photo: Lena Köster)

Some 2,600 foreign students are enrolled at the University of Würzburg. Law student Shama Busha Pongo from the Congo came to Germany four years ago and he knows exactly what he wants.

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Microscope image of a dividing embryo of the nematode C. elegans.

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have published new insights into waste disposal in animal cells. These findings may help to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases like lupus.

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