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Press Releases

Philipp Sodmann (left) and Matthias Griebel developed a deep learning model that can evaluate microscopic images.

Microscopic images of tissue sections can now be analyzed much more easily – with an innovative digital tool. Two researchers from Würzburg have received three prizes for this.

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Beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors in heart muscle cells: In the left cell, beta1 receptors are labeled – they are found both on the cell surface (yellow) and in the T-tubules (green). In the right cell, the beta2-receptors are labeled – they appear only in the T-tubules (green), but not on the cell surface (which is therefore not visible in the image).

Research teams from Würzburg, Munich, Erlangen and the MDC in Berlin have identified, for the first time, where special receptors are located on heart muscle cells. Their findings open up new perspectives for developing therapies for chronic heart failure.

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The image shows a "topolectric circuit" used to realize the topological states studied here

Through a recently developed experimental platform, topological matter can be realized in a fast, cost efficient, and versatile way. Würzburg physicist have now achieved with it a breakthrough that might enable optronic technologies in the long run.

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Researchers from Jülich and Würzburg are jointly investigating new, exotic quantum states that form at interfaces between superconductors and topological materials. The image shows a quantum dot contact structure constructed at JMU from the topological insulator mercury telluride (blue), which is contacted with superconducting electrodes (green). An electrostatic gate (yellow) is used to control current conduction across the junction. Similar structures will be used in the future to investigate fundamental properties of topological qubits.

Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Würzburg will together investigate the quantum phenomena of topological materials and the opportunities they present within quantum computing. The Free State of Bavaria is funding the project to the tune of € 13 million.

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Microscopic picture of a CD8+ T cell in the CNS of a two-year-old mouse. The cytotoxic T cell (red labelling) is located in immediate proximity to a damaged nerve fiber (green labelling) and is, according to the described results, involved in its damage. The cell nuclei of all cell bodies in the image are labelled in blue. Scale bar: 20 µm.

Certain immune cells can cause damage to the aging central nervous system, according to a novel study by scientists of the University Hospital and the University of Würzburg.

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The novel platform LEOPARD has the potential to detect a variety of disease-related biomarkers in just one test.

A novel diagnostic technology can make tests for corona and other pathogens much more efficient. It is based on discoveries made by Würzburg scientists.

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A crane takes the researchers to the uppermost treetops to study the seasonal fluctuations of the water balance.

When trees die during a drought event, they die of thirst: A field study on spruce trees shows that an abrupt collapse of the hydraulic system is responsible.

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SONATE-2 in orbit: Visualisation of the new technology testing satellite for highly autonomous payloads and artificial intelligence.

Building a satellite with artificial intelligence on board that is trained in space: For this project, Professor Hakan Kayal from Würzburg is receiving 2.6 million euros from the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.

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Schematic representation of the coherent control of a spin defect (red) in an atomic layer of boron nitride. Boron nitride consists of boron (yellow spheres) and nitrogen (blue spheres) and lies on a stripline. The spin defect is excited by a laser and its state is read out via photoluminescence. The qubit can be manipulated both by microwave pulses (light blue) of the stripline and also by a magnetic field.

An international research team has made progress towards improved materials for quantum sensor technology. Medicine, navigation and IT could benefit from this in the future.

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During drought, the signalling molecule GABA is produced and inhibits the opening of leaf pores (left). If the enzyme GAD2, which converts glutamate to GABA, is genetically switched off, the pores remain open even during drought - the plants lose more water (centre). If the gene for GAD2 is reintroduced into the closing cells, the defect is reversed. The experiment shows that the sphincter cells autonomously perceive stress and react to it with GABA production.

During drought, plants use a signalling molecule known from animals to limit their water loss. The molecule provides them with a kind of memory of how dry the day was.

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Violet light triggers a signalling chain in the light sensor protein switch-Cyclop, blue or green light stops the chain. At the end, the production of the signalling molecule cGMP is regulated by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC).

New tool for cell biology: Würzburg researchers have developed a light sensor with an enzyme function that can be switched on and off with different light colours.

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Model of the SMN complex, stained yeast cells can be seen in the background.

Capturing the structure of large molecular complexes with variable shape is an extremely difficult task. Scientists from Würzburg and Montpellier now have been able to do it – thanks to a new approach regarding an important protein machine.

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Not an injection, but a capsule that can simply be swallowed: This is what vaccination against Covid-19 could look like in the future.

Scientists at the University of Würzburg together with a pharmaceutical company are working on a novel approach to oral vaccination against the coronavirus.

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Measurements have shown how the hummingbird hawkmoth uses optic flow for flight control and orientation.

How do hawkmoths use visual patterns in different parts of their visual field? While researching this question, a team from the Würzburg Biocentre experienced a surprise.

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