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    Press Releases

    For the first time, two molecules of atmospheric nitrogen (blue, middle) are coupled directly to each other in research by chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt.

    Direct coupling of two molecules of nitrogen: chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt have achieved what was thought to be impossible. This new reaction is reported in Science magazine and opens new possibilities for one of the most inert molecules on earth.

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    Cells of a neuroblastoma: The red dots mark sites where the BRCA1 protein occurs in close contact with the RNA polymerase II. This is only the case if the protein MYCN is also present (right).

    Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumour cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. In "Nature", a Würzburg research team shows how the proteins can do this.

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    Icefish under water

    Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them. Scientists have now investigated how they still manage to exist there and what evolutionary adaptations they have had to undergo in order to do so.

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    Two open stomatal pores on the surface of a fern leaf, each surrounded by two kidney-shaped guard cells. Right panel: important moments during the evolution of stomata. Stomata probably evolved in an early land plant, from which all today’s species descend, but were likely lost in liverworts. Some genes that control stomatal movement in flowering plants likely arose recently, in seed plants, from within ancient gene families that were present in algae. Signalling genes with specific roles in guard cells likely arose after mosses diverged from a common ancestor.

    Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team at the University of Würzburg is investigating how plants control their water balance.

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    Professor Antoni Llobet forscht mit einem Humboldt-Preis am Zentrum für Nanosystemchemie der Uni Würzburg.

    Chemistry professor Antoni Llobet (Spain) joins the University of Würzburg with a research prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He is a worldwide leading expert in the field of oxidative water splitting with sunlight.

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    Treatment with fluconazole can lead to genetic changes in Candida albicans that make the fungus capable of mating.

    Under the influence of the drug fluconazole, the fungus Candida albicans can change its mode of reproduction and thus become even more resistant. Scientists at the University of Würzburg report this in the journal mBio.

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    German thoroughness meets Russian improvisation skills in the project of Markus Vogelgsang and Jana Kail: to build an automotive production facility in Moscow.

    They studied Slavic studies and economics; today they commute between Germany and Russia. The two alumni, Jana Kail and Markus Vogelgsang, have never regretted their choice of subjects.

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    Schematic representation of the formation of gephyrin-artemisinin complex.

    Researchers at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg have unveiled the molecular effectiveness of artemisinins. The findings could lead to drugs for diseases such as Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and epilepsy.

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    Ein Medizin-Roboter im Einsatz. In Europa ist die Skepsis gegenüber Robotern gestiegen.

    In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago. This is shown in a new study published by scientists from Linz and Würzburg.

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    In this multicellular Volvox alga, the novel light sensor 2c-cyclop was labeled with fluorescence (green). It shows up in membranes around the nucleus. (Image: Eva Laura von der Heyde)

    Scientists at the Universities of Würzburg and Bielefeld in Germany have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae. The sensor triggers a reaction that is similar to one in the human eye.

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    Fruit Fly

    Insects and mammals have special sensors for different light intensities. These sensors selectively influence the circadian clocks and thereby control daily activity patterns.

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    Thomas Eckel walking through a coffee plantation.

    A cup of coffee in Hawaii set the decisive course in his life. Today Alumnus Thomas Eckel is the managing director of a coffee roasting company. He advises students to look outside the box.

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    Microscopy of centrioles.

    Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures? That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably.

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