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Rudolf Virchow Center for Integrative and Translational Bioimaging

Press Archive

Press Archiv

Collaborative work of research groups at the University of Würzburg and the TU Dresden has provided important new insights for cancer research. During cell division specific target proteins have to be turned over in a precisely regulated manner. To this end specialized enzymes label the target proteins with signaling molecules. However, the enzymes involved in this process can also label themselves, thus initiating their own degradation. In a multidisciplinary approach, the researchers identified a mechanism of how enzymes can protect themselves from such self-destruction and maintain sufficient concentrations in the cell. These results have been published in the latest issue of Science Signaling.

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A research group from Würzburg has now been able to clarify the long-standing question of how the protein complex CDK-activating kinase (CAK), which controls the central processes of cell division and transcription, is activated. The group analyzed the active form of the protein/CAK complex and was able to decipher its function on a molecular level. These new findings provide the basis for further research on cancer drugs and were published in the renowned scientific journal PNAS.

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A cancer shredder

09/29/2020

Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development.

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The previously largely unknown molecule bridging integrator 2 (BIN2) plays a central role in platelet activation, as researchers from Würzburg have now shown in a joint project of the DFG Collaborative Research Centre / Transregio 240. This finding provides indications of starting points for drug development against thrombosis, heart attack and stroke and was published in the renowned journal The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Using a newly developed method, researchers from the University of Würzburg, in cooperation with the University Hospital of Würzburg, were able to identify thousands of special peptides on the surface of cells for the first time. They were able to show that these so-called cryptic peptides mark a significant proportion of tumor cells. These findings could provide a new starting point for cancer immunotherapy and were published in the renowned journal Cancer Immunology Research.

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Die Hauptprotease (grün) ist ein wichtiges Molekül, das dem Virus bei der Vermehrung hilft. Mit einem geeigneten Medikament (hier in rot als Stabmodell) könnte das Molekül in seiner Funktion gehemmt werden.

Dr. Andrea Thorn, a structural biologist from Würzburg, is leading an international coronavirus research network. The results of her work are important for developing vaccines and drugs.

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Tuberculosis is a highly contagious infectious disease that is typically spread through aerosols and mainly affects the lungs. Every year, an estimated 1.7 million people worldwide die from such an infection.

Researchers at the University of Würzburg and the Spanish Cancer Research Centre have gained new insights into the pathogen that causes tuberculosis. The work published in Nature provides the basis for a new approach in antibiotic therapy.

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Visualizing specific structures over background fluorescence can be challenging. The Wehman lab has developed a labeling technique based on selective degradation that allows super-resolution insights on standard microscopes, improving the imaging of specific proteins, organelles, and cells in many model systems. The project has been published in Nature Communications.

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Dr. Hardikkumar Jetani (Mitte) mit dem Promotionskomitee und Vertreterinnen der Graduate School (v.l.): Prüfungsvorsitzender Professor Thomas Rudel, Professor Thomas Herrmann, PD Dr. Friederike Berberich-Siebelt, Dr. Michael Hudecek, Dr. Gabriele Blum-Oehler, Professorin Caroline Kisker.

PhD student Hardikkumar Jetani has a round number to his name: he is the 500th doctoral researcher in the Graduate School of Life Sciences (GSLS) to successfully defend his thesis.

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Researchers from the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg (JMU) have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities. Both enzymes promote the growth of various tumors. The results were published in the journal Molecular Cell and could benefit towards the development of new, low-side-effects anticancer drugs.

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